Pandemic Ponderings #201

Lyrics is the word for the Art Group prompt.

I created this image giving an almost identical value to the word and the picture.

Which is the most important?

The words or the music?

So many lyrics so little time was my first thought.

For this reason I sent myself down a rabbit hole , investigating the lyrics of one hit wonders. A genre of popular music that seems to suffer from less interesting lyrics, in my opinion. It was quite the rabbit hole and gave me an exception that proved the, self imagined, rule.

There is a curious transatlantic difference which muddied things a bit.Listed One Hit Wonders in the U.S are often from well established British bands that simply never made a prolonged success of music in the U.S. The lyrics of these One Hit Wonders are of a higher calibre.

The UK list has more solidly poor lyrics. Then a golden nugget of a One Hit Wonder landed at my fingertips.

One Hit Wonder on both sides of the Atlantic.

One Hit Wonder for the original writer.

One hit Wonder for the recording artist.

Poetry/Lyric crossover One Hit Wonder.

Surely in a Pandemic what the world needs is a re-release of Desiderata.

Max Ehrman was a lawyer and writer of Poetry. Desiderata was his only well known poem.

Les Crane was a spunky ex Air Force pilot who became a provocative and well respected TV presenter, quite what persuaded him to record a hippy new age recording of Max Ehrmans poem in 1971 is not making itself obvious to me. It’s more spoken word than lyric , but some of the words are sung, making it so much more lyrical.

It made him a One Hit Wonder
https://youtu.be/3bUTcy6w2Rw

Lyrics, just words that take you places.

Serendipity Sunday

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Detail from etched stained glass at The Bulls Head, Barnes.

Some days you get more time than is truly necessary for the task in hand. A trip to Barnes for a classical concert with some additional unexpected hours gave us time to explore the town and it’s excellent charity and coffee shops.The Thames shapes this northeast portion of the London Borough of Richmond- on- Thames. The Thames was our first destination. We were both gig rowers so we love a bit of paddle action. On a Sunday this portion of the river is busy with rowers, the boats seem impossibly flimsy compared to a sea- faring gig and the speeds impressive. The promenade alongside the river is raised up to give pedestrians a good view of the rowing. Crowds on this bank are a familiar sight on Boat Race Day. We walked for as long as the weather was good and then took shelter in The Bulls Head. I’ve wanted to visit this significant Jazz venue for a very long while. My dad loved Jazz, his desire to visit the jazz venues of his dreams and experience live jazz was thwarted, probably, by my arrival when he was only 27 and then by the realities of life. For a while when I was his adult child we shared some jazz experiences and since his death I’ve continued to, occasionally, dip into Jazz. I don’t give it enough attention,  every time I do I realise what I’m missing. The Bulls Head is a fabulous building for music, two Barnesian musicians have rooms named after them, Holst and Bolan. Not surprisingly the background music is brilliant, as was the food. Proper live Jazz in the back room will have to wait for another day. We were destined for a classical afternoon at St Michael and All Angels Church.

https://www.thebullsheadbarnes.com/

Barnes Concert Band gave a performance of Dixieland Jazz, ( so we did get some live jazz) Klezmer, classics and theme tunes. Over an hour of intriguing and different music played in a beautiful church with great acoustics was followed by an excellent afternoon tea also provided by the band.

https://barnesconcert.band

theoldmortuary was there being supportive and proud of a brother and brother-in-law. He is the bands musical director. It was a really fabulous performance.

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Stuff

IMG_9963In our home we have to find space for ‘stuff’. The belongings or memorabilia from two sets of parents, now dead, and two previous individual homes. That’s a big ask of a small cottage. The sensible answer to this is that you can’t keep everything : recycling out to charity shops is not only the answer , it is also the right thing to do. If we don’t need it then a much better use is to generate money for a charity while getting it into the hands of someone else who can make use of it.

To achieve a  balance and have a home that is organically styled rather than superficially beautiful with no depth of character we have curated some collections.

Casually placed in a couple of rooms are small collections of old vinyl records. Pre dating bespoke covers they have cardboard sleeves advertising the shops that sold them. They take up very little space but give a big warm hug of remembrance every time they catch your eye.

Real Interior Design