#94 theoldmortuaryponders

Is the 10th of January 2022 a little late to conclude the reading and viewing plans of the 2021 Festive season?

Even the 10th of January is pushing the truth a bit as my piles of to-be- read books are nicely replenished by the festive season. Just a nice number to revel in rather than overwhelm me.

This book gave me this particular deadline as it is the Bookworms Book Group read and the meeting is today. For completeness I also watched the BBC 4 part dramatisation. Link below.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episodes/p08qf8md/us

I enjoyed both, David Nichols writes books that have emotional depth even if some of his characters lack it, deliberately. The BBC drama had the added benefit of giving me 10 minutes when I could enjoy the acting talents of my lovely next door neighbour, Keith,who had, unknown to me, a small part in episode 3.

I say ‘unknown to me’ as if I insist on knowing where my neighbour has his small parts. This is not the case!

Us gave me light relief after an ill advised Christmas read. My favourite historical period to read is what is known in English speaking worlds as The Jazz Age or Roaring Twenties or in French Années Folles.

My book of choice was-

On Christmas Eve I commented that I was unsure where the book was going. By Christmas Day I was all to aware that the destination was Jersey in World War 2. Even more of a surprise and grimly shocking was that I was actually reading a Biography. It is not that the book wasn’t well written or that I am not glad to have read it but maybe not my usual subject matter for the Yuletide!

Let the reading of 2022 commence.

Pandemic Pondering #30

Book bags and Woodland walks, featuring dog bums

We don’t forward plan much these days. A firming up of rules on driving to exercise during Coronovirus Restrictions freed us up to venture just a little further afield. The journey also gave us the chance to drop bags of books on the doorsteps of ‘Shielding Bookworms’ , actually members of a local book club,who need to self isolate for 12 weeks. Describing them as I did I made them sound like a covert infestation requiring pesticide.

Cadsonbury Woods, a Riverside walk near Callington has been a favourite walk for 30 years. It has an additional uphill walk to an ancient Hill Fort. We rarely do that because we always have the dogs and the fields are often being grazed by sheep. Without the dogs we would normally sprint up hills of such challenging gradients like mountain goats. Not today.
https://www.tamarvalleyvibe.uk/?p=1639

There were a few cars in the car park but we mostly had the woods to ourselves. Most visitors must have been of the mountain goat variety.

The birdsong was beautiful and recent work, felling trees to protect the river bank from erosion, had really opened up the walk to bright daylight. We even found a Memorial Bench.

There’s a lot of dog bums in the following pictures, some faces, some nature in springtime but I completely forgot to take a picture of the most significant part of the outing.

A cup of tea from a flask and a shortbread biscuit, which we had to share, after a couple of hours of walking in the woods. Bliss in these unusual times.

Pandemic Ponderings#21

Evolving Bookworms. I belong to a small bookgroup. We provide ourselves with book sets loaned by Cornwall Library Service, we’ve just read our last book issued before libraries closed their doors as part of Coronovirus. The system is pretty easy, groups choose a years worth of book sets from a list on the Library website. The sets are then delivered to our local library once a month. The system is not foolproof and we don’t always get a set that we selected but every month there is a set of books waiting for us at the library. Unexpected books have given us the opportunity to read something none of us would have chosen, we always have lively discussions regardless of how much the book was enjoyed.

So that’s pre- pandemic book club, but now we are in Pandemic Bookworming.

We opted to use WhatsApp as our platform of choice, too many of us to use the video function but we could record voice messages and obviously write our opinions. We used it live for two hours during the time our actual meeting would have taken place. One unusual aspect for our group is that the book remains with us so I’ve been able to reread bits of the book with new insight provided by my bookworm colleagues. I can re listen to their comments and read the written notes. Normally we hand the book back.

Why did we never think of a WhatsApp group before? Bookworms unable to attend the meetings could have been fully involved even on months when attending a meeting was impossible.

For the next month the WhatsApp group remains open for bookish chat and for our next month two hour meeting we will bring a piece.of poetry to the group and talk about our individual literary adventures.

Initially I’m switching gear a bit. Swapping H E Bates Uncle Silas, a book that was not much to my taste despite some amazing descriptions of country ways.

Flights by Olga Tokarczuk was in my holiday reading pile until this morning. A pile that will sustain me for some time.

If reading about books is your thing I can really reccomend this blog.
https://dovegreyreader.typepad.com/dovegreyreader_scribbles

I’ve been reading it for years. This woman is single handedly responsible for my dreadful piles … Of books.

dovegreyreader lives on Dartmoor, not far from here. Her blog is based on books but roams on Dartmoor and ponders on a variety of stuff.